4 Key Parts of a Big Campaign Idea

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In this video, Kevin discusses the four parts of a big campaign idea—a structure you can use when presenting and discussing campaign ideas with agencies and creative teams.


Transcript:

Hello, Kevin Namaky here. Today we’re going to talk about the four key parts of a big campaign idea. 

Before we dive straight into the components of a big campaign idea, it makes sense for us to talk about what a campaign idea is. 

What is a Big Campaign Idea?

A big campaign idea (as opposed to a smaller, one-off tactical idea) is defined by a few key characteristics:

  1. It dramatizes the strategy. 
  2. It translates the strategy into customer-friendly terms that the consumer can relate to. 
  3. It is extendable and repeatable. 

These are not small executional ideas that your agency would come to you with. Rather, a big campaign idea will kick off a major campaign that translates across mediums and stands the test of time. 

4 Key Parts of a Big Campaign Idea

When it comes to presenting/reviewing campaign ideas as a team, there are four key parts of a big campaign idea. These components must be clearly laid out in order to have good discussion and provide feedback to agency or creative teams.  

Core Dramatization (Visual)

This is how we dramatize or visualize the strategy (i.e., key takeaway or benefit) from the creative brief. This needs to be clearly demonstrated through copy, visuals and/or sound. For example, if video is part of the media plan, then it makes sense to create a visual drawing that illustrates the core dramatization. 

Idea Description (Short)

You need an idea description, but something very short. You don’t need lengthy paragraphs of information. Instead, 1 or 2 sentences describing the idea is sufficient.

Key Copy Words

This is the selling line or tagline. It’s often a key singular line of advertising copy that you might execute based on the idea. It puts the desired belief into memorable, consumer-friendly terms. 

Extendability (Potential Variations)

You need some articulation of how the idea is extendable. This might include variations on the idea to make up a bigger campaign, or contextual differences—how the idea might appear in various communication channels. Or, you might illustrate how the campaign might stay fresh over time. 

Conclusion 

Those are the four key components of a big campaign idea. When you’re in agency or creative team discussions, those components will help clearly communicate the big idea and drive meaningful discussion. Use a template or board outlining the key components, instead of storyboards or detailed executions. Focusing on these four components will help you focus on the essence of the big idea and how it will deliver your strategy. 


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